Salt Sugar Fat

Salt Sugar Fat

By Michael Moss

  • Release Date: 2013-02-26
  • Genre: Business & Personal Finance
Score: 4
4
From 223 Ratings
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Description

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The Atlantic • The Huffington Post • Men’s Journal • MSN (U.K.) • Kirkus Reviews • Publishers Weekly

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • WINNER OF THE JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION AWARD FOR WRITING AND LITERATURE


Every year, the average American eats thirty-three pounds of cheese and seventy pounds of sugar. Every day, we ingest 8,500 milligrams of salt, double the recommended amount, almost none of which comes from the shakers on our table. It comes from processed food, an industry that hauls in $1 trillion in annual sales. In Salt Sugar Fat, Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter Michael Moss shows how we ended up here. Featuring examples from Kraft, Coca-Cola, Lunchables, Frito-Lay, Nestlé, Oreos, Capri Sun, and many more, Moss’s explosive, empowering narrative is grounded in meticulous, eye-opening research. He takes us into labs where scientists calculate the “bliss point” of sugary beverages, unearths marketing techniques taken straight from tobacco company playbooks, and talks to concerned insiders who make startling confessions. Just as millions of “heavy users” are addicted to salt, sugar, and fat, so too are the companies that peddle them. You will never look at a nutrition label the same way again.
 
Praise for Salt Sugar Fat
 
“[Michael] Moss has written a Fast Food Nation for the processed food industry. Burrowing deep inside the big food manufacturers, he discovered how junk food is formulated to make us eat more of it and, he argues persuasively, actually to addict us.”—Michael Pollan
 
“If you had any doubt as to the food industry’s complicity in our obesity epidemic, it will evaporate when you read this book.”The Washington Post
 
“Vital reading for the discerning food consumer.”The Wall Street Journal
 
“The chilling story of how the food giants have seduced everyone in this country . . . Michael Moss understands a vital and terrifying truth: that we are not just eating fast food when we succumb to the siren song of sugar, fat, and salt. We are fundamentally changing our lives—and the world around us.”—Alice Waters
 
“Propulsively written [and] persuasively argued . . . an exactingly researched, deeply reported work of advocacy journalism.”The Boston Globe

“A remarkable accomplishment.”The New York Times Book Review

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Reviews

  • The cold, hard Truth

    5
    By 9lm6rmc
    Excellent book on the food industry and how we are fooled by them. After reading this book you will view the grocery store and food industry a whole lot differently. I was amazed at how bad it really is. Not surprised anymore, but amazed at how far they will go to earn their profit. A great read for ever a Mom out there who is trying to raise their family healthy.
  • His Pulitzer is no surprise

    5
    By Imperformative
    What a compelling look at how the processed food industry functions. It's not just well-written and informative, it's useful and necessary.
  • Excellent

    5
    By Shakyra Moore
    Eye-opening, full of information and complete surprises, this book was a great read. At first, one would expect this book to be a health freak's bible, however, instead of outright shaming the reader for consuming the fruits of this industry's labor, it opens the reader's eye to the history of why things are the way they are in our society and how changing is ultimately in our hands. This book equips the reader with all the backing for making better choices in the grocery aisle. Just great.
  • Salt, Sugar, Fat ... Building blocks of an epidemic

    5
    By Nunezra
    The true cost of "saving time" turning down old fashioned precepts such as meal preparation and family dinner in favor of convenience foods and "on the go snacks" are clearly visible as we deal with an obesity epidemic and struggle to maintain our families. The author does a good job of showing us the under belly of the industrial food complex who put short term profit ahead of your family's long term wellness or health. I recommend this book as mandatory reading for all 10th graders and think their parents should bring Sunday diners back !
  • Grabs and keeps your attention

    5
    By Megzemke
    I think I may not have gotten through this book if I had read it traditionally, but the narrator they chose made the audio version of this book absolutely riveting. To be sure, the material is very interesting, but there is a lot of information to process. From the beginning, the narrator reads the book as if unfolding a mystery, and made me want to keep listening to find out what happens next. The book itself is an eye opening account of processed food that is good information for everyone to know. Highly, highly recommended.
  • Salt Sugar Fat

    4
    By Miki'sbigmouth
    An enlightening look inside the processed food industry, well researched and with plenty of anecdotes to keep your interest. Unfortunately, many chapters end in a repeat of the previous three or so pages so whatever point the author might be trying to make is lost. Please fix this e book formatting problem!
  • One of the best books I've ever read

    5
    By HallahanC43
    Really opened my eyes and made me think twice about what I eat.
  • Good book

    5
    By jj goodman
    I liked it very informative
  • Home Run!

    5
    By dc2k4
    Michael Moss presents an unbiased and extremely informative background to the food industry. Brands we've all heard of and consumed are brought to life in an easy to read and very educational tone! Reminded me of the Dan Ariley/Malcolm Gladwell style of authorship.
  • Saw author on Dr. Oz...

    4
    By tastewart7845
    Can't wait to get into this book! The author talks about "cravability" and how food companies keep you hooked with salt, sugar, and fat. Hopefully when I'm done reading I can break my own addiction to process foods and move to more whole foods. Even if a small portion of this is true, and he claims to have viewed millions of documents from food companies, SHAME ON THEM!

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